macnews.net.tc
2006-01-16
Apple's Terminology Problems?
"We're using intel's new dual-core processor, the 'Core Duo', with the MacBook Pro", you said, Steve. Everything alright, so far. But then you go on to add: "Each chip is as fast as a G5, and the MacBook Pro has two of them!" Now we're in trouble, Steve... Throughout your keynote, you made it very difficult for ordinary people to understand, what exactly is inside a MacBook Pro or an iMac. Is it two processors? One? One dual-core processor or two of those? Or is it rather like the following statement that reminds me of an old Monty Python's joke? -> "It has a dual core processor. That's actually two processors. And every processor has two cores, which means two processors. So it has four processor. And each of those has two cores..."

PLEASE, Apple! Get your terminology right. The new iMac and the new MacBook Pro have _one_ intel core duo processor per machine. Each processor has two cores. Which still makes it _one_ processor. Not two. Thank you.
Comments:
And, according to Intel, this is the equivalent of having two processors:

Explained most simply, multi-core processor architecture entails silicon design engineers placing two or more Pentium® processor-based “execution cores,” or computational engines, within a single processor. This multi-core processor plugs directly into a single processor socket, but the operating system perceives each of its execution cores as a discrete logical processor, with all the associated execution resources.

http://www.intel.com/cd/ids/developer/asmo-na/eng/201969.htm?page=2

So, basically, a distinction without a difference. The Core Duo is a single physical chip that contains two separate processors embedded in the same silicon. If Steve had said it was a single processor, he would have been inaccurate, as well.
 
Actually, I just re-watched that part of the keynote. At 1:07:13, Steve says that they are putting Intel's latest and greatest "chip" in the iMac. Then he says the "chip" has two "processors" on one die "it's a dual processor". At 1:07:31 he says "each of these processor is, in itself, faster than the G5 . . . and there's 2 of them."

So, Apple had their terminology right. The new iMac and MacBook Pro have_one_Intel core duo CHIP per machine. Each chip with 2 cores or processors.
 
I know, I know. :) Ah, take it with a little grain of humour... ;) I just find it funny, that for the PowerMacs, they were talking about "cores" alright, but now with the "Core Duo" (which even has "core" in its name), they switch to calling the cores "processors", which - in my opinion - isn't true. Or at least: It can be difficult.
 
Sorry! I see your point. Actually, Intel doesn't even really call them dual processors, but rather dual execution cores, which are "perceived" by the OS (a sentient being? HAL?) to be two processors.

Great site, keep it up.
 
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